About Volkswagen Westfalia Campers

Published: 26th July 2009
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As most of us are aware, Volkswagen Westfalia Campers were conversions of Transporter or Micro-Bus of the early 1950s through 2003. Volkswagen is a registered trademark in the United States and many other countries in the world.



As most of us are aware, Volkswagen Westfalia Campers were conversions of Transporter or Micro-Bus of the early 1950s through 2003. Volkswagen is a registered trademark in the United States and many other countries in the world. Volkswagon subcontracted the conversions to Westfalia-werke - more popularly known as Westfalia. Between 1951 and August 1958, approximately 1,000 Camper Box conversions were made by Westfalia, the official Volkswagon Camper conversion coachbuilder. Westfalia special models included the SO-23; the SO-34, SO-35, SO-33, SO-42, SO-44 and SO-45.



Volkswagen Campers became available from Volkswagen dealers throughout the world. Volkswagen Westfalias were offered in different color combinations depending on the model year and camper configuration. The Volkswagen Westfalia Campers accommodate four passengers with sleeping facility. It has two full-sized double adult beds, a kitchenette with a double-burner gas stove, sink with water pump and 10.5 gallon water tank, and a refrigerator.



The Volkswagen campers come with a pop-up roof, sliding side door, large windows to facilitate sightseeing, and plenty of cabinet space. There are rotating front seats, a dining table, electric and water hook-ups, propane tank, privacy curtains, and a fire extinguisher.



1968-1971 Westfalia Camper: The second generation of campers was launched in 1968 incorporating many technical over the previous Splitty fitted with 1600cc upright motor. The advantage of this new motor was parts were very cheap and easily available. The noticeable drawback however was that it was to an extent underpowered for such a heavy vehicle as a Westfalia camper, resulting in a slower top speed and reduced engine life. Options like stove and fridge were not there and sleeping facilities were limited to two adults and two children.



1972-1973 Westfalia Camper: These were the ones fitted with the new pancake engine. The principal advantage of this engine is many items can be serviced without removing the motor (heads, alternator, pushrod tubes, etc.)



1974-1975 Westfalia Camper: During this time, VW began to optimize their Type 4 motor. Displacement was increased from original capacity to 1800cc, and in 1975, fuel injection and a larger clutch were fitted. The Westfalia interior became more sophisticated. It was redesigned to fit a full double-bed instead of a child's cot. The front seats were provided with headrests, the sink fitted with a electric pump, and conveniences like fridge, gas stove, dual battery were offered. These were also the time when the brightly colored plaid upholstery was introduced

1976-1979 Westfalia Camper: These last years had some dramatic changes. The motor was now at a massive two liters though the horsepower stayed roughly the same at 1.8. Also, in 1978, the camper got hydraulic lifters, eliminating the cumbersome valve adjustments. The interior was made more traveler-friendly. A more commodious layout was achieved by placing all the cabinetry behind the driver's seat leaving open space behind the passenger seat.



The interior layout in the Westfalia campers, though changed many times, stayed essentially the same throughout the years. Volkswagen Westfalias were offered in different color combinations depending on the model year and camper configuration. It is a reliable sturdy vehicle with loads of storage room capable of all travel stresses and strains.



Brayan Peter is an expert author for Vanagon. He has written many articles like Vanagon Camper, VW Vanagons, Camper Van, Honda Elements, Used Roadtrek. For more information visit our site Vanagon Westfalia. Contact me at info.poptopheaven@gmail.com


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